Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Apparently skirting the no campaign rule on Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, candidates made their presence felt on Twitter and Facebook, which have yet to be regulated by the Commission on Elections.

In Bataan, a candidate for councilor, Jules Moncupa, posted what appeared to be his campaign material on his Facebook account and asked his Facebook friends to “share” it.

Screengrab from Facebook.

“GAME NA! … Please Share, my friends. Thanks. :-).” he posted.

In his photo, Moncupa described himself as “Kaibigan ng Bayan (everyone’s friend)” and “outstanding councilor of Bataan.” His ballot number, 16, was also placed near his name.

The photo’s time stamp on Facebook indicated it was posted at 3:14 a.m., March 29.

The campaign period for local candidates was supposed to start today but since it is a Good Friday, it can only start on March 30, Black Saturday.

Under Republic Act 7166, the campaign period may exclude the day before Election Day, the day of the election itself, Maundy Thursday, and Good Friday.

Comelec Resolution 9385, which lists the calendar of activities for the campaign period, also notes that campaigning on Maundy Thursday and Good Friday is prohibited.

Some national candidates merely posted Holy Week and vacation-related messages on their Twitter account while others plugged online articles where they were mentioned, such as GMA News Online’s Isyu ng Bayan matrix.

But other candidates posted rants while there were also candidates who plugged their party’s proclamation rally. Administration’s Team PNoy posted some photos of sorties and election initiatives, including the 7-11 cup program.

Screengrab from Twitter.

Violation?

In a text message to GMA News Online, Comelec spokesperson James Jimenez said he cannot call the posts violations of election rules just as yet but he will let the Comelec law department evaluate them.

“Hindi kasi natin nire-regulate ang Facebook e. So I hesitate to call that a violation. Pwede natin ipa-evaluate sa law department namin,” he said.

“Comelec generally does not monitor Twitter and Facebook postings except in relation to campaign spending and possible vote-buying schemes,” Jimenez added.

In Resolution 9615, the poll body regulates online campaign propaganda such as pop-ups, rectangles, banners, buttons and skyscrapers except on social networking sites.

Poll chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. earlier said they will issue clearer guidelines on social networking sites during the campaign period after they checked how politicians use the platform.

“This is new, this is something innovative, itong social media. Kaya dapat titingnan muna natin, hindi pwedeng detalye agad. We will see how effective it is during the start of the campaign period,” Brillantes said. —KG, GMA News

 

Amanda Bynes‘ behavior continues to puzzle and concern us.

On Tuesday, the 26-year-old’s best attempt to thwart the paparazzi was all for naught, as she was clearly spotted roaming around Times Square. The fact that the self-described retired multi-millionaire chose one of the world’s busiest and most public places to try to avoid the cameras isn’t even the strangest part. What’s more peculiar is that Bynes tried to hide from photographers by putting a blue button-down shirt over her head.

Bynes’ attempt at hiding proved to be almost dangerous, as she couldn’t see where she was going and almost ran into a metal pole and into oncoming traffic.

The Times Square incident is just the latest in a string of increasingly erratic behavior, which reportedly has her family “concerned for her welfare.”

Bynes made headlines last week when she tweeted that she wanted Drake to “murder [her] vagina,” and has since been back on Twitter complaining that she looks “pudgy.”

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After her run-in with the paparazzi, Bynes turned to Twitter again, this time posting a series of selfies (and she still hasn’t seemed to figure out that she should turn her flash off when taking them), writing:

We’re worried. So worried, that we fear the actress might be hallucinating, since we can’t imagine who would possibly think launching an Amanda Bynes clothing and perfume line at this time would be a good idea.

Samsung's latest devices, next to Apple in real life, not on the Twitters.

A new analysis of Twitter found that more people tweeted about the iPhone 5 on its unveiling day than Samsung’s Galaxy S4.

A recent analysis of Twitter activity during the debut of Apple and Samsung’s latest smartphones shows a wide difference in how much both products were mentioned.

That study, done by Investing Analytics, showed that the iPhone 5 was mentioned in more than five times the number of tweets than the Galaxy S4 on the day of, and the day after their respective unveilings.

“We believe a Twitter analysis of tweets about the iPhone 5 launch compared to the Galaxy S4 launch demonstrates that the iPhone continues to hold more mass appeal with consumers,” said Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster in a note about the data set.

“We believe this demonstrates that while interest in the Galaxy S4 is growing, Apple continues to hold a meaningful lead as the smartphone with the broadest consumer appeal,” he added.

The actual tally during that time period was about 2.4 million tweets about the iPhone 5, whereas Samsung’s Galaxy S4 racked up around 440,000. Even so, Munster says the majority of the tweets about Samsung’s product (81 percent) were positive, up from the iPhone 5’s 73 percent.

Apple took the wraps off the iPhone 5 last September, whereas Samsung unveiled the Galaxy S4 at an event in New York earlier this month. Samsung’s device, which is a follow-up to the popular Galaxy S3, sports a higher resolution 5-inch display, faster processor, better cameras and battery than its predecessor. The device goes on sale in the U.K. next month, with other markets to follow.

 

source – http://www.cnet.com

What does The Red Equal Sign MEANS?..

MARRIAGE-EQUALITY-MEME

MARRIAGE-EQUALITY-MEME

This questions can raise in your minds….We tried to find the answers….

This morning, you may have noticed an onslaught of red equal signs taking over your Facebook feed … and maybe even your Twitter stream. And Instagram. What we’re witnessing here is a social campaign gone viral – and if you’re feeling out of the loop (as obvious as the symbol may be), we’re going to break it down for you.

What’s up with these red equal signs?

The United States Supreme Court is hearing an argument today about Hollingsworth v. Perry, a case that will determine whether California’s controversial Proposition 8 law is constitutional. Prop 8 declares marriage can only be between a man and a woman, so if the Court strikes it down, it will be celebrated as a victory for everyone who supports marriage equality. Tomorrow, the Court will hear United States v. Windsor, which will determine the constitutional fate of DOMA, or the Defense of Marriage Act. Together, these two cases are by far the deepest the Supreme Court has entered into the debate over marriage.

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To say this is a significant moment in the fight for equal rights is an understatement – even though neither outcome will determine the legality of gay marriage in the U.S., both decisions will have a major impact on how the issue is addressed in the future.

So where did the red and pink icon itself start? The Human Rights Campaign, an organization that advocates for LGBT rights, changed its symbol from a blue and yellow equal sign to the pink on red version today to draw attention to the importance of the Court decisions explained above.

How did it spread so fast?

The HRC is a sizable lobby, and it does a good job of engaging with the Facebook community – right now, over 40,000 shared its original post to spread the word some 23 hours ago, and that’s just from the group’s homepage.

Internet superstars like George Takei helped boost support by re-posting to their popular pages; Takei got over 60,000 “likes” for his post.

And it’s not just Facebook. The red sign migrated to Twitter and Instagram as well – hashtags like #MarriageEquality and #SCOTUS are trending, with people changing their pictures there to the red equal sign, and many others weighing in – including President Obama’s official account:

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Taking the sign and running with it

A lot of people are putting individual twists on the symbol, adding some personality to the otherwise identical see of red equal signs.

Now, obviously not everyone in the United States supports marriage equality, or it wouldn’t be as contentious an issue.

In fact, a recent study illustrated how what people express on Twitter differs from actual mainstream opinion, and the same likely holds true for Facebook. And since the Twitter study showed that opinions on Twitter did not match up how people voted for Prop 8, it’s safe to say social media is not an entirely accurate barometer for popular sentiment.

Still, there isn’t an anti-gay marriage symbol gaining nearly as much traction. The closest thing we found was the National Organization for Marriage’s symbol, and while the group didn’t come prepared with a viral-ready image, it is advertising a march on the Capitol today to defend Prop 8 and DOMA.

Social media’s problems predicting actual popular opinion may stem from who uses it. Twitter users skew younger than the general population, so while this marriage equality meme campaign’s popularity doesn’t necessarily mean that mainstream opinion has shifted substantially, it does mean that the kind of people who post on social media – which is generally a younger demographic – hold these views. And that may help presage future popular sentiment, if not how the nation feels on average today.

We still don’t know how the Court will decide these pivotal cases, but at least we can take comfort in the fact that we know how “The Golden Girls” felt about marriage equality:

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/social-media/red-equal-signs-take-over-facebook-the-birth-of-a-marriage-equality-meme/#ixzz2Oo6WOuMG
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