Apparently skirting the no campaign rule on Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, candidates made their presence felt on Twitter and Facebook, which have yet to be regulated by the Commission on Elections.

In Bataan, a candidate for councilor, Jules Moncupa, posted what appeared to be his campaign material on his Facebook account and asked his Facebook friends to “share” it.

Screengrab from Facebook.

“GAME NA! … Please Share, my friends. Thanks. :-).” he posted.

In his photo, Moncupa described himself as “Kaibigan ng Bayan (everyone’s friend)” and “outstanding councilor of Bataan.” His ballot number, 16, was also placed near his name.

The photo’s time stamp on Facebook indicated it was posted at 3:14 a.m., March 29.

The campaign period for local candidates was supposed to start today but since it is a Good Friday, it can only start on March 30, Black Saturday.

Under Republic Act 7166, the campaign period may exclude the day before Election Day, the day of the election itself, Maundy Thursday, and Good Friday.

Comelec Resolution 9385, which lists the calendar of activities for the campaign period, also notes that campaigning on Maundy Thursday and Good Friday is prohibited.

Some national candidates merely posted Holy Week and vacation-related messages on their Twitter account while others plugged online articles where they were mentioned, such as GMA News Online’s Isyu ng Bayan matrix.

But other candidates posted rants while there were also candidates who plugged their party’s proclamation rally. Administration’s Team PNoy posted some photos of sorties and election initiatives, including the 7-11 cup program.

Screengrab from Twitter.

Violation?

In a text message to GMA News Online, Comelec spokesperson James Jimenez said he cannot call the posts violations of election rules just as yet but he will let the Comelec law department evaluate them.

“Hindi kasi natin nire-regulate ang Facebook e. So I hesitate to call that a violation. Pwede natin ipa-evaluate sa law department namin,” he said.

“Comelec generally does not monitor Twitter and Facebook postings except in relation to campaign spending and possible vote-buying schemes,” Jimenez added.

In Resolution 9615, the poll body regulates online campaign propaganda such as pop-ups, rectangles, banners, buttons and skyscrapers except on social networking sites.

Poll chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. earlier said they will issue clearer guidelines on social networking sites during the campaign period after they checked how politicians use the platform.

“This is new, this is something innovative, itong social media. Kaya dapat titingnan muna natin, hindi pwedeng detalye agad. We will see how effective it is during the start of the campaign period,” Brillantes said. —KG, GMA News

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